Ondioline

"It seems very pretty," she said when she finished it, "but it's rather hard to understand."

Nothing in that Drawer

Nothing in that drawer.
Nothing in that drawer.
Nothing in that drawer.
Nothing in that drawer.
Nothing in that drawer.
Nothing in that drawer.
Nothing in that drawer.
Nothing in that drawer.
Nothing in that drawer.
Nothing in that drawer.
Nothing in that drawer.
Nothing in that drawer.
Nothing in that drawer.
Nothing in that drawer.

- Ron Padgett

This poem often gets labeled a sonnet. Is it a sonnet? It has 14 lines. It has a turn if one believes that each repetition feels more frantic than the one previous. It has a rhyme scheme, albeit simpler than most sonnets. It is not in iambic pentameter, but many sonnets are not in iambic pentameter. It does not really matter if it is a sonnet.

Curiously, each line, though the same as every other line, reads differently than every other line. Each line grows more and more desperate. There are as many lines about drawers as there are ambiguities about these lines about drawers. Is there one drawer, repeated by the narrator in disbelief? Are there several drawers all containing nothing?  Is there a drawer with something in it somewhere, but nothing in that drawer in particular?

All one knows is that there is nothing in that drawer. 

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